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slackware:localization [2012/12/14 14:56 (UTC)]
bocke [Setting the console font] Fixed a typo. Thanx elesmod for the report.
slackware:localization [2013/02/09 23:35 (UTC)] (current)
alienbob Some fixes in language and layout.
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 ====== Localization:​ Adapt Slackware to your own Language ====== ====== Localization:​ Adapt Slackware to your own Language ======
  
-<note important>​Work In Progress</​note>​ +This page contains ​instructions about how to adapt your Slackware installation to your own language.
-FIXME This page will contain ​instructions about how to adapt your Slackware installation to your own language.+
  
 ===== Overview ===== ===== Overview =====
  
 Contrary to other distributions,​ Slackware is pretty much an English language-oriented distro. The installer is not localized - it is available in English only.  Contrary to other distributions,​ Slackware is pretty much an English language-oriented distro. The installer is not localized - it is available in English only. 
-During installation you have only the choice of keyboard-layout for the console and can choose support for UTF-8 in the console (which is done in lilo.conf with a kernel-parameter). ​+During installation you have only the choice of keyboard-layout for the console and can choose support for UTF-8 in the console (which is done in ''/​etc/​lilo.conf'' ​with a kernel-parameter). ​
 However, it is not hard to localize your Slackware system so that it displays commands in your own language and uses a graphical desktop environment which is using your language, metrics system and other localizations. However, it is not hard to localize your Slackware system so that it displays commands in your own language and uses a graphical desktop environment which is using your language, metrics system and other localizations.
  
-There are several settings which more or less are independent from each other. The keyboard-layout for the console can be chosen during installation,​ but is independent from the keyboard-layout when X11 is running. Unicode-support (UTF-8) extends the normal ASCII table and helps to display characters which are not contained in the English language. +There are several settings which more or less are independent from each other. The keyboard-layout for the console can be chosen during installation,​ but is independent from the keyboard-layout when X11 is running. Unicode-support (UTF-8) extends the normal ASCII table and helps to display characters which are not contained in the English language. ​\\  
-The environment-variable $LANG can be set system wide or "per user", ​it (roughly spoken) ​defines ​which language applications use when they interact with the user. +The environment-variable $LANG can be set system wide or "per user". Basicallythis variable ​defines ​the language ​that applications ​will use when they interact with the user. \\  
-Also it is important to distinguish if the computer boots to run level 3 (console) or run level 4 (with X11).+Also it is important to distinguish if the computer boots to run level 3 (console) or run level 4 (graphical X-Window login).
  
 ===== The Timezone ===== ===== The Timezone =====
  
-If you need to change the timezone of your system you can simply use (as root) the tool ''​timeconfig''​ on the commandlineSetting ​the timezone manually ​means to copy the string for your timezone from /​usr/​share/​zoneinfo/​ to the file /​etc/​localtime. \\ **Example:​** +If you need to change the timezone of your system you can simply use (as root) the tool ''​timeconfig''​ on the command-lineIf you want, you can set the timezone manually ​by copying ​the string for your timezone from ''​/​usr/​share/​zoneinfo/​'' ​to the file ''​/​etc/​localtime''​. \\ **Example:​** <​code>​ 
-<​code>​cp /​usr/​share/​zoneinfo/​Europe/​Berlin /​etc/​localtime</​code>​+cp /​usr/​share/​zoneinfo/​Europe/​Berlin /​etc/​localtime 
 +</​code>​
  
 ===== Locale ===== ===== Locale =====
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 # en_US is the Slackware default locale: # en_US is the Slackware default locale:
 export LANG=nl_NL.UTF-8 export LANG=nl_NL.UTF-8
-</​code> ​ Note that Slackware is not fully Unicode-prepared. Some applications (like the man pages) will not properly display Unicode text. For some languages (in particular the non-Latin ones) it is mandatory to enable Unicode support or else the character glyphs will not be displayed (you will see nothing but small rectangles instead).+</​code> ​ Note that Slackware is not fully Unicode-prepared. Some applications (like the man pages) will not properly display Unicode text. For some languages (in particular the non-Latin ones) it is mandatory to enable Unicode support ​(see further down) or else the character glyphs will not be displayed (you will see nothing but small rectangles instead).
  
 ==== Per User Configuration ==== ==== Per User Configuration ====
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 If you do not want to pre-define the locale for everyone, you can set these same environment variables for the individual user. If you do not want to pre-define the locale for everyone, you can set these same environment variables for the individual user.
  
-In that case you would not be using ''/​etc/​profile.d/​lang.sh''​ but define these variables in the user's shell initialization file. //Bash reads different ​rc-files depending ​if it is called as a login-shell or as a non-login-shell.// When the user logs into the console, Bash is called as a login-shell and sources the ~/.profile in the user'​s ​home-directory. Therefore one puts the line +In that case you would not be using ''/​etc/​profile.d/​lang.sh''​ but instead ​define these variables in the user's shell initialization file. //Bash reads different ​initialization ​files depending ​on being called as a login shell or as a non-login shell.// When the user logs into the console, Bash is called as a //login shell// and sources the file ''​~/.profile'' ​in the user'​s ​homedirectory. Therefore one adds the line <​code>​ 
-<​code>​LANG=de_DE.utf8</​code>​into ~/.profile. C-shell users would edit ''​~/​.cshrc''​ instead.+LANG=de_DE.utf8 
 +</​code>​into ​''​~/.profile''​ in order to enforce a german language. C-shell users would edit ''​~/​.cshrc''​ instead.
  
 ===== Console ===== ===== Console =====
  
-** Note that only root is permitted to use liloconfig and pkgtool! **+** Note that only root is permitted to use ''​liloconfig'' ​and ''​pkgtool''​! **
  
 ==== Setting up LILO for Unicode ==== ==== Setting up LILO for Unicode ====
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 {{:​slackware:​install:​37-lilo-utf-8.png?​350|}} {{:​slackware:​install:​37-lilo-utf-8.png?​350|}}
  
-If you choose the default option ("​No"​),​ you can set it up later by appending the option "​vt.default_utf8" ​to your lilo.conf.: +If you choose the default option ("​No"​),​ you can enable Unicode in the console ​later by appending the option "''​vt.default_utf8''​" ​in your ''​lilo.conf''​ file: <​code>​ 
- +# Start LILO global section
-<​code>#​ Start LILO global section+
 # Append any additional kernel parameters: # Append any additional kernel parameters:
 append="​vt.default_utf8=1"​ append="​vt.default_utf8=1"​
-boot = /​dev/​sdx</​code>​ +boot = /dev/sdx 
- +</​code>​ 
-Or by using liloconfig: +Or by using ''​liloconfig''​: <​code>​liloconfig</​code>​
-<​code>​liloconfig</​code>​+
  
 Reboot your system to apply changes. Reboot your system to apply changes.
  
-//Note: liloconfig is also available from setup section of pkgtool.// +//​Note: ​''​liloconfig'' ​is also available from the "setup" ​section of ''​pkgtool''​.//
  
 ==== Setting the console font ==== ==== Setting the console font ====
  
-System ​setup section of Slackware installer allows you to set-up ​a custom font:+The system ​setup section of Slackware'​s ​installer allows you to configure ​a custom font:
  
 {{:​slackware:​install:​57-console-font.png?​350|}} {{:​slackware:​install:​57-console-font.png?​350|}}
  
-If you choose "​Yes",​ you'll get the option to choose ​the desired font. +If you choose "​Yes",​ you'll get the option to try out and eventually select ​the desired font.
  
-This settings are stored in /​etc/​rc.d/​rc.font.+These settings are stored in ''​/​etc/​rc.d/​rc.font''​.
  
-If you chose not to install custom fonts, you can do that later: either by changing/​adding the font in /​etc/​rc.d/​rc.font, ​either ​by running setconsolefont script: +If you chose not to install custom fonts, you can do that later: either by changing/​adding the font in /​etc/​rc.d/​rc.font, ​or  ​by running ​the ''​setconsolefont'' ​script: <​code>​setconsolefont</​code>​
-<​code>​setconsolefont</​code>​+
  
 {{:​slackware:​install:​58-font-select.png?​350|}} {{:​slackware:​install:​58-font-select.png?​350|}}
  
-//Note: setconsolefont shows only a fixed list of fonts. Any additionally installed fonts won't appear on the list.//+//​Note: ​''​setconsolefont'' ​shows only a fixed list of fonts. Any additionally installed fonts won't appear on the list.//
  
-//Note: setconsolefont is also available from setup section of pkgtool.//+//​Note: ​''​setconsolefont'' ​is also available from the "setup" ​section of ''​pkgtool''​.//
  
-//Note: Console fonts are found in /​usr/​share/​kbd/​consolefonts. You can also use an absolute path as an argument.//+//Note: Console fonts are found in ''​/​usr/​share/​kbd/​consolefonts''​. You can also use an absolute path as an argument.//
  
 ==== Temporarily changing the font ==== ==== Temporarily changing the font ====
  
-You can temporary ​change the font by using setfont utility (part of kbd package). If you specify non-unicode ​font under unicode ​console mode, setfont will try to automatically load unicode ​mappings if available. Nowadays most of the fonts already contain embedded ​unicode ​maps. For more info and additional options, see the setfont ​manual.+You can temporarily ​change the console ​font by using the ''​setfont'' ​utility (part of the ''​kbd'' ​package). If you specify ​non-Unicode ​font under Unicode ​console mode, ''​setfont'' ​will try to automatically load Unicode ​mappings if available. Nowadays most of the fonts already contain embedded ​Unicode ​maps. For more info and additional options, see the ''​setfont''​ man page.
  
-//Note that **setconsolefont also uses setfont internally**. so this applies to it too.// ​+//Note that **''​setconsolefont'' ​also uses ''​setfont'' ​internally**. so this applies to it too.// ​
  
 <​code>​setfont font</​code>​ <​code>​setfont font</​code>​
  
-When ran without an option, setfont loads the default font:+When invoked ​without an option, setfont loads the default font:
 <​code>​setfont</​code>​ <​code>​setfont</​code>​
- 
  
 ==== Loading a custom console keymap ==== ==== Loading a custom console keymap ====
  
-You can use setkeys tool to setup the current keymap. For example: +You can use the ''​setkeys'' ​tool to reconfigure ​the current keymap. For example:
 <​code>​loadkeys hu</​code>​ <​code>​loadkeys hu</​code>​
  
-Keymaps are located in /​usr/​share/​kbd/​keymaps. They usually contain some notes on encoding/​additional key bindings. ​IE: sr-cyr is Serbian Cyrillic keymap. It's an ISO-8859-5 keymap. Right shift is bound as a switch between US English and Serbian Cyrillic. ​Other example is Russian keymap (UTF-8, ​ctrl+shift as a switch key).+Keymaps are located in ''​/​usr/​share/​kbd/​keymaps''​. They usually contain some notes on encoding/​additional key bindings. ​I.e."sr-cyr" ​is Serbian Cyrillic keymap. It's an ISO-8859-5 keymap. Right-Shift ​is bound as a switch between US English and Serbian Cyrillic. ​Another ​example is the Russian keymap (UTF-8, ​Ctrl+Shift as a switch key).
  
 Keymap files are compressed textual descriptions and are easily viewable with zcat. For example: Keymap files are compressed textual descriptions and are easily viewable with zcat. For example:
- 
 <​code>​zcat /​usr/​share/​kbd/​keymaps/​i386/​azerty/​fr-pc.map.gz | head | grep "​^#"</​code>​ <​code>​zcat /​usr/​share/​kbd/​keymaps/​i386/​azerty/​fr-pc.map.gz | head | grep "​^#"</​code>​
  
-Which will show us all the comments in the first 10 lines of the file +Which will show us all the comments in the first 10 lines of the file<​code>​ 
- +# fr-pc.map for French PC keyboard (non-US 102 keys)
-<​code>#​ fr-pc.map for French PC keyboard (non-US 102 keys)+
 # #
 #  1997-3-5 #  1997-3-5
 #  Seak, Teng-Fong <​seak@drfc.cad.cea.fr>​ #  Seak, Teng-Fong <​seak@drfc.cad.cea.fr>​
-#</​code>​ +# 
 +</​code>​
  
 ==== Temporary Unicode consoles with unicode-start/​unicode-stop ==== ==== Temporary Unicode consoles with unicode-start/​unicode-stop ====
  
-If you want to set up Unicode only temporary, you can do that by using unicode-start and unicode-stop scripts (parts of kbd package)+If you want to set up Unicode only temporarily, you can do that by using the ''​unicode-start'' ​and ''​unicode-stop'' ​scripts (part of the ''​kbd'' ​package) ​<​code>​unicode-start</​code>​
  
-<​code>​unicode-start</​code>​ +This will back-up the current keymap ​definition ​into ''​~/.kbd''​, setup the current virtual console for UTF-8 and load the default font (LatArCyrHeb-16). You can also specify a font of your choosing by adding parameters in the invocation of the script: <​code>​ 
- +unicode-start font 
-This will back-up the current keymap into ~/.kbd, setup current virtual console for UTF-8 and load the default font (LatArCyrHeb-16). You can also specify a font of your choosing by adding parameters in the invocation of the script: +</​code>​ or: <​code>​ 
- +unicode-start font unimap 
-<​code>​unicode-start font</​code>​ +</​code>​
-or: +
-<​code>​unicode-start font unimap</​code>​+
  
-for the description of font and unimap parameters and the default locations, check setfont manual:+For the description of //font// and //unimap// parameters and the default locations, check the ''​setfont'' ​manual:
 <​code>​man setfont</​code>​ <​code>​man setfont</​code>​
  
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 ==== Diagnostics ==== ==== Diagnostics ====
  
-You can check if the current console is properly configured for unicode+You can check if the current console is properly configured for Unicode
  
 Run stty with "​-a"​ option: Run stty with "​-a"​ option:
 <​code>​stty -a</​code>​ <​code>​stty -a</​code>​
  
-If you see "​-iutf8"​ among the results, current virtual console is not configured for UTF-8, otherwise if you see "​iutf8"​ (without minus sign), the vc is properly configured.+If you see "​-iutf8"​ among the results, ​the current virtual console is not configured for UTF-8, otherwise if you see "​iutf8"​ (without minus sign), the //vc// is properly configured.
  
 Run kbd_mode without arguments: Run kbd_mode without arguments:
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 This will display the current keyboard mode (usually XLATE or UTF-8). This will display the current keyboard mode (usually XLATE or UTF-8).
- 
  
 ===== X11 Locales ===== ===== X11 Locales =====
  
-When your computer boots into runlevel 4 and uses one of the login-managers (for example: gdm, kdm or xdm), the ~/.profile file is sourced in any case. This means if your system uses "per user" settings (as described above) for $LANG, ​this settings remain valid in X11. The window managers and desktop environments (except KDE) should then come up with menus in your language+When your computer boots into //runlevel 4// and uses one of the login managers (for example: gdm, kdm or xdm), the ''​~/.profile'' ​file is sourced in any case. This means if your system uses "per user" settings (as described above) for $LANG, ​these settings remain valid in X11. The window managers and desktop environments (except KDE) should then come up with menus in your language.
- +
-When you startx from runlevel 3 your $LANG-settings from the console are applied to the windowmanager.+
  
 +When you run ''​startx''​ from //runlevel 3// your "​$LANG"​ settings from the console are applied to the window manager.
  
 ===== X11 keyboard setup ===== ===== X11 keyboard setup =====
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 **Keep in mind:** some desktop environments might use their own layout settings, practically overriding these settings. Most notable example is KDE. **Keep in mind:** some desktop environments might use their own layout settings, practically overriding these settings. Most notable example is KDE.
  
-If you want a non-English keyboard-layout with X, you'll have to adapt the config files. The generic config-files are in /​usr/​share/​X11/​xorg.conf.d/​ and those you want to use, you'll have to copy to the /​etc/​X11/​xord.conf.d/​ directory.  +If you want a non-English keyboard layout with X, you'll have to adapt the config files. The generic config files are found in ''​/​usr/​share/​X11/​xorg.conf.d/​'' ​and those you want to use, you'll have to copy to the ''​/​etc/​X11/​xord.conf.d/​'' ​directory. ​\\  
-The X-server reads only those config files within the /​etc/​X11/​xorg.conf.d/​ directory! +The X-server reads only those config files within the /​etc/​X11/​xorg.conf.d/​ directory! <​code>​ 
-<​code>​cp /​usr/​share/​X11/​xorg.conf.d/​90-keyboard-layout.conf /​etc/​X11/​xorg.conf.d</​code>​ +cp /​usr/​share/​X11/​xorg.conf.d/​90-keyboard-layout.conf /​etc/​X11/​xorg.conf.d 
-Then open the file with your favorite text editor and find the line +</​code>​ 
-<​code>​Option "​XkbLayout"​ "​us"</​code>​ +Then open the file with your favorite text editor and find the line <​code>​ 
-Change "​us"​ to your languagecode, for example "​de"​ for German. +Option "​XkbLayout"​ "​us"​ 
-Additionally you may want to edit the line +</​code>​ 
-<​code>​Option "​XkbVariant ""</​code> ​+Change "​us"​ to your language code, for example "​de"​ for German. 
 +Additionally you may want to edit the line <​code>​ 
 +Option "​XkbVariant ""​ 
 +</​code> ​
 and insert your favorite keyboard-variant,​ for example "​nodeadkeys"​ and insert your favorite keyboard-variant,​ for example "​nodeadkeys"​
  
 === Using multiple keyboard layouts === === Using multiple keyboard layouts ===
-**Why is this useful?​** ​\\ + 
 +**Why is this useful?**
   * Several people use one computer but prefer different keyboard layouts.  ​   * Several people use one computer but prefer different keyboard layouts.  ​
   * People use another script (e.g. Greek or Cyrillic), they'​ll have to switch to English layout always when they want to type a command. \\    * People use another script (e.g. Greek or Cyrillic), they'​ll have to switch to English layout always when they want to type a command. \\ 
 Therefore this configuration can be very important although many people will never have to use it. Therefore this configuration can be very important although many people will never have to use it.
  
-You can also specify more than one keyboard layout: +You can also specify more than one keyboard layout: <​code>​ 
-<​code>​Option "​XkbLayout"​ "​us,​rs"</​code>​+Option "​XkbLayout"​ "​us,​rs"​ 
 +</​code>​
  
-That also include ​using different variants: +That also includes ​using different variants: <​code>​ 
-<​code>​Option "​XkbLayout"​ "​us,​rs,​rs"​ +Option "​XkbLayout"​ "​us,​rs,​rs"​ 
-Option "​XkbVariant ",​latin,"</​code>​ +Option "​XkbVariant ",​latin,"​ 
-In this example we set-up ​three keyboard layouts - US English, Serbian ​latin and Serbian Cyrillic. Note the same number of commas as in XkbLayout option. The empty "​fields"​ mean we are using the default variants for the layouts without specified variant.+</​code>​ 
 +In this example we configure ​three keyboard layouts - US English, Serbian ​Latin and Serbian Cyrillic. Note the same number of commas as in the ''​XkbLayout'' ​option. The empty "​fields"​ mean we are using the default variants for the layouts without specified variant.
  
 === Easy layout switching === === Easy layout switching ===
  
-You can also specify a shortcut to easily change the layout. ​ +You can also specify a shortcut to easily change the layout. <​code>​ 
-<​code>​Option "​XKbOptions"​ "​grp:​alt_shift_toggle"</​code> ​+Option "​XKbOptions"​ "​grp:​alt_shift_toggle"​ 
 +</​code> ​ 
 +This will change the layout by pressing on Alt+Shift.
  
-This will change the layout by pressing on alt+shift. +There are also other group switching combinations you can setup ((See the complete list of options in ''​/​usr/​share/​X11/​xkb/​rules/​base.lst''​)):
- +
-There are also other group switching combinations you can setup ((See the complete list of options in /​usr/​share/​X11/​xkb/​rules/​base.lst)):​+
  
   * grp:toggle - right alt   * grp:toggle - right alt
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 === Changing the keyboard layout with setxkbmap === === Changing the keyboard layout with setxkbmap ===
  
-The following description addresses those users who need "per user" settings for their keyboard-layout in X11. This means that the system wide settings for X11 are different from their needs and it is not possible to change them. Read the manpage ​if you need detailed information.+The following description addresses those users who need "per user" settings for their keyboard-layout in X11. This means that the system wide settings for X11 are different from their needs and it is not possible to change them. Read the man page if you need detailed information.
  
 You can find out your current settings of the keyboard-layout in X11 with the command <​code>​setxkbmap -query</​code>​ You can find out your current settings of the keyboard-layout in X11 with the command <​code>​setxkbmap -query</​code>​
-An overview of setxkbmap is available with <​code>​setxkbmap -help</​code>​+An overview of ''​setxkbmap'' ​is available with <​code>​setxkbmap -help</​code>​ 
 + 
 +The language and variant of the keyboard layout can easily be configured with (the following example lines refer to German language with variant "​nodeadkeys"​) <​code>​ 
 +setxkbmap de 
 +setxkbmap -variant nodeadkeys 
 +</​code>​
  
-The language and variant of the keyboard layout can be simply set with (the following examplelines refer to German language with variant "​nodeadkeys"​). 
-<​code>​setxkbmap de 
-setxkbmap -variant nodeadkeys</​code>​ 
 == Where to place the code? == == Where to place the code? ==
-If your system boots into **runlevel 3**, which means that you login on the console and then startx, you can put the above code at the top of your ** ~/​.xinitrc**. \\ 
-If your system boots into **runlevel 4** and you login with login-manager like gdm, kdm or xdm, you should insert it to your ** ~/​.xprofile**. This file is sourced by any of the login-managers. Please note that ~/.xprofile isn't created by default, you must create it by yourself. 
  
 +If your system boots into **runlevel 3**, which means that you login on the console and then startx, you can put the above code at the top of your ** ~/​.xinitrc**. \\
 +If your system boots into **runlevel 4** and you login with a login manager like gdm, kdm or xdm, you should insert it to your ** ~/​.xprofile**. This file is sourced by any of the login managers. Please note that ''​~/​.xprofile''​ isn't created by default, you must create it by yourself.
  
 ===== Desktop Environments ===== ===== Desktop Environments =====
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 When you're running KDE you'll have to install the language-package (l10n-packages) for your language. The KDE l10n-packages reside in the kdei series. If you download Slackware from a mirror, be sure not to download all of the l10n-packages but only the ones you need, there'​s one for KDE and one for Calligra for each language. When you're running KDE you'll have to install the language-package (l10n-packages) for your language. The KDE l10n-packages reside in the kdei series. If you download Slackware from a mirror, be sure not to download all of the l10n-packages but only the ones you need, there'​s one for KDE and one for Calligra for each language.
  
-//Note: The following settings are not necessary when you startx from runlevel 3 and have your language settings already applied.// In this case KDE takes the settings from your environment.+//Note: The following settings are not necessary when you ''​startx'' ​from runlevel 3 and have your language settings already applied.// In this case KDE takes the settings from your environment.
  
-When the l10n-package is installed and you start KDE for the first time, open the launcher and click on <key>System Settings</key> ​ +When the l10n-package is installed and you start KDE for the first time, open the launcher and click on //System Settings//. 
-In the System Settings click on Locale and select ​you country in the drop-down menu.  +In the System Settings click on Locale and select ​your country in the drop-down menu.  
-Afterwards go through all the tabs and select your language, number-format,​ currency-format,​ calendar-format,​ format for date&​time and in "​other"​ the settings for page-size and measurement-units. +Afterwards go through all the tabs and select your language, number-format,​ currency-format,​ calendar-format,​ format for date & time and in "​other"​ the settings for page-size and measurement units. ​\\  
-You can also configure the spelling-checker in this window.+You can also configure the spelling-checker in this window. ​\\ 
 When KDE is configured for your language, the office-suite Calligra starts automatically with the correct language-settings,​ provided that you've installed the Calligra language-package. When KDE is configured for your language, the office-suite Calligra starts automatically with the correct language-settings,​ provided that you've installed the Calligra language-package.
  
 === Keyboard layout === === Keyboard layout ===
  
-[[howtos:​window_managers:​keyboard_layout_in_kde|Keyboard Layout in KDE]] +We have a separate page in our Wiki for this: [[howtos:​window_managers:​keyboard_layout_in_kde|Keyboard Layout in KDE]] 
-==== Xfce localization====+ 
 +==== Xfce localization ====
  
 XFCE doesn'​t have a GUI tool for internationalized settings. It will pickup your locale settings from the environment. Also, there are no separate packages for locale data - everything is included in the main XFCE packages. Keep in mind most of XFCE localizations are seriously lagging behind those of several most popular languages. For more information on how to help localizing XFCE in your language you might take a look at [[http://​wiki.xfce.org/​translations|Xfce'​s localization page]]. XFCE doesn'​t have a GUI tool for internationalized settings. It will pickup your locale settings from the environment. Also, there are no separate packages for locale data - everything is included in the main XFCE packages. Keep in mind most of XFCE localizations are seriously lagging behind those of several most popular languages. For more information on how to help localizing XFCE in your language you might take a look at [[http://​wiki.xfce.org/​translations|Xfce'​s localization page]].
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 === Keyboard layout === === Keyboard layout ===
  
-[[howtos:​window_managers:​keyboard_layout_in_xfce|Keyboard Layout in XFCE]]+Please consult our Wiki page [[howtos:​window_managers:​keyboard_layout_in_xfce|Keyboard Layout in XFCE]]
  
 ===== Dictionaries and Spelling checkers ===== ===== Dictionaries and Spelling checkers =====
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 ==== Spelling checkers ==== ==== Spelling checkers ====
  
-By default Slackware comes with aspell, ispell and hunspell. The dictionary for English is already installed. For other languages you can find the dictionaries on the DVD or the mirrors in the /​extra/​aspell-word-lists/​ directory.+By default Slackware comes with aspell, ispell and hunspell. The dictionary for English is already installed. For other languages you can find the dictionaries on the DVD or the mirrors in the ''​/​extra/​aspell-word-lists/​'' ​directory.
  
 ==== Dictionaries for Applications ==== ==== Dictionaries for Applications ====
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 For people who write mails in various languages there'​s also a "​dictionary-switcher"​ available for Thunderbird. You can search in the "​Add-Ons"​-menu of Thunderbird. For people who write mails in various languages there'​s also a "​dictionary-switcher"​ available for Thunderbird. You can search in the "​Add-Ons"​-menu of Thunderbird.
  
-If you have Libreoffice ​installed from [[http://connie.slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​libreoffice/​|AlienBob'​s page]] there are also language-packages available. If you have installed the l10n-package for your language, this provides also a dictionary for the spelling checker.+If you have LibreOffice ​installed from [[http://​slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​libreoffice/​|AlienBob'​s page]] there are also language-packages available. If you have installed the l10n-package for your language, this provides also a dictionary for the spelling checker.
  
 ===== Applications ===== ===== Applications =====
  
-Most programs in Slackware come with multi language support out of the box. They will adapt their behaviour ​according to the locale you have defined.\\ ​+Most programs in Slackware come with multi-language support out of the box. They will adapt their behavior ​according to the locale you have defined.\\ ​
 There are a few notable exceptions. Slackware'​s Mozilla packages for Firefox, Thunderbird and Seamonkey are not localized. They are examined below. There are a few notable exceptions. Slackware'​s Mozilla packages for Firefox, Thunderbird and Seamonkey are not localized. They are examined below.
  
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 ==== Mozilla-Firefox ==== ==== Mozilla-Firefox ====
  
-AlienBob provides an l10n [[http://connie.slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​mozilla-firefox-l10n/​|SlackBuild.script]] which seems to be the most convenient way to localize Firefox.+AlienBob provides an l10n [[http://​slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​mozilla-firefox-l10n/​|SlackBuild.script]] which seems to be the most convenient way to localize Firefox.
  
 It is also possible to do it pretty much the same way as with Mozilla-Thunderbird (see below). After installing the xpi-file you type ''​about:​config''​ into the address-field Firefox in order to open the //​config-editor//​. There you type useragent and change the //​useragent.local//​ to your language. This is in more detail explained for Thunderbird. It is also possible to do it pretty much the same way as with Mozilla-Thunderbird (see below). After installing the xpi-file you type ''​about:​config''​ into the address-field Firefox in order to open the //​config-editor//​. There you type useragent and change the //​useragent.local//​ to your language. This is in more detail explained for Thunderbird.
 +
 ==== Mozilla-Thunderbird ==== ==== Mozilla-Thunderbird ====
  
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 AlienBob provides [[http://​connie.slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​libreoffice/​|Slackware-packages for LibreOffice]] and additionally the [[http://​connie.slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​libreoffice/​|l10n-packages]] for it. AlienBob provides [[http://​connie.slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​libreoffice/​|Slackware-packages for LibreOffice]] and additionally the [[http://​connie.slackware.com/​~alien/​slackbuilds/​libreoffice/​|l10n-packages]] for it.
 +
 ===== Further Reading ===== ===== Further Reading =====
  
-For those of you who are interested in additional information,​ here are some Links.\\ +For those of you who are interested in additional information,​ here are some links.\\  
-Thanks to Didier Spaier for contributing.\\ +Thanks to Didier Spaier for contributing. 
-[[http://​pubs.opengroup.org/​onlinepubs/​009695399/​basedefs/​xbd_chap06.html#​tag_06|opengroup.org Character Set]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​pubs.opengroup.org/​onlinepubs/​009695399/​basedefs/​xbd_chap06.html#​tag_06|opengroup.org Character Set]] 
-[[http://​pubs.opengroup.org/​onlinepubs/​009695399/​basedefs/​xbd_chap07.html#​tag_07|opengroup.org Locale]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​pubs.opengroup.org/​onlinepubs/​009695399/​basedefs/​xbd_chap07.html#​tag_07|opengroup.org Locale]] 
-[[http://​pubs.opengroup.org/​onlinepubs/​009695399/​basedefs/​xbd_chap08.html#​tag_08_02|opengroup.org Environment Variables]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​pubs.opengroup.org/​onlinepubs/​009695399/​basedefs/​xbd_chap08.html#​tag_08_02|opengroup.org Environment Variables]] 
-[[http://​eyegene.ophthy.med.umich.edu/​unicode/​|University of Michigan - Primer on Unicode]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​eyegene.ophthy.med.umich.edu/​unicode/​|University of Michigan - Primer on Unicode]] 
-[[http://​www.utf-8.com/​|utf-8.com UTF-8 and Unicode Standards]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​www.utf-8.com/​|utf-8.com UTF-8 and Unicode Standards]] 
-[[http://​linuxdocs.org/​HOWTOs/​Unicode-HOWTO.html|linuxdocs.org The Unicode HOWTO]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​linuxdocs.org/​HOWTOs/​Unicode-HOWTO.html|linuxdocs.org The Unicode HOWTO]] 
-[[http://​www.sourceware.org/​glibc/​wiki/​Locales|For Programmers:​ Locales in GLIBC]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​www.sourceware.org/​glibc/​wiki/​Locales|For Programmers:​ Locales in GLIBC]] 
-[[http://​www.unicode.org/​faq/​|unicode.org FAQ]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​www.unicode.org/​faq/​|unicode.org FAQ]] 
-[[http://​people.w3.org/​rishida/​scripts/​pickers/​|w3.org Unicode Character Pickers]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​people.w3.org/​rishida/​scripts/​pickers/​|w3.org Unicode Character Pickers]] 
-[[http://​www.eki.ee/​letter/​|Data on Languages]]\\ +  ​* ​[[http://​www.eki.ee/​letter/​|Data on Languages]] 
-[[http://​duganchen.ca/​writings/​slackware/​fonts/​|Dugan Chen's Homepage - Getting Unicode/​UTF-8 support - Slackware related]]\\+  ​* ​[[http://​duganchen.ca/​writings/​slackware/​fonts/​|Dugan Chen's Homepage - Getting Unicode/​UTF-8 support - Slackware related]]
  
 ====== Sources ====== ====== Sources ======
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   * Contributions by [[wiki:​user:​bocke | Bojan Popovic]]   * Contributions by [[wiki:​user:​bocke | Bojan Popovic]]
   * Contributions by [[wiki:​user:​markush | Markus Hutmacher]]   * Contributions by [[wiki:​user:​markush | Markus Hutmacher]]
-<!-- * Contributions by [[wiki:​user:​yyy | User Y]] --> 
  
 <!-- Please do not modify anything below, except adding new tags.--> <!-- Please do not modify anything below, except adding new tags.-->
 {{tag>​slackware localization author_alienbob}} {{tag>​slackware localization author_alienbob}}
  

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