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slackware:install [2012/09/11 23:02 (UTC)]
alienbob [Post Installation] Add link to multilib article.
slackware:install [2013/01/13 16:44 (UTC)]
whiz [Booting the Installer]
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 Once your computer boots from the CD you'll be taken to a screen that allows you to enter any special kernel parameters. This is here primarily to allow you to use the installer as a sort of rescue disk. Some systems may need special kernel parameters in order to boot, but these are very rare exceptions to the norm. Most users can simply press enter to let the kernel boot. Once your computer boots from the CD you'll be taken to a screen that allows you to enter any special kernel parameters. This is here primarily to allow you to use the installer as a sort of rescue disk. Some systems may need special kernel parameters in order to boot, but these are very rare exceptions to the norm. Most users can simply press enter to let the kernel boot.
 +{{ :​slackware:​install:​1-welcome.png?​nolink |}}
  
-  Welcome to Slackware version 13.37 (Linux kernel 2.6.37.6)! + 
-   +
-  If you need to pass extra parameters to the kernel, enter them at the prompt +
-  below after the name of the kernel to boot (huge.s etc). +
-   +
-  In a pinch, you can boot your system from here with a command like: +
-   +
-  boot: huge.s root=/​dev/​sda1 rdinit= ro  +
-   +
-  In the example above, /dev/sda1 is the / Linux partition. +
-   +
-  This prompt is just for entering extra parameters. ​ If you don't need to enter +
-  any parameters, hit ENTER to boot the default kernel "​huge.s"​ or press [F2]  +
-  for a listing of more kernel choices. +
 You should see a lot of text go flying across your screen. Don't be alarmed, this is all perfectly normal. The text you see is generated by the kernel during boot-up as it discovers your hardware and prepares to load the operating system (in this case, the installer). You can later read these messages with the ''​dmesg(1)''​ command if you're interested. Often these messages are very important for troubleshooting any hardware problems you may have. Once the kernel has completed its hardware discovery, the messages should stop and you'll be given an option to load support for non-us keyboards. You should see a lot of text go flying across your screen. Don't be alarmed, this is all perfectly normal. The text you see is generated by the kernel during boot-up as it discovers your hardware and prepares to load the operating system (in this case, the installer). You can later read these messages with the ''​dmesg(1)''​ command if you're interested. Often these messages are very important for troubleshooting any hardware problems you may have. Once the kernel has completed its hardware discovery, the messages should stop and you'll be given an option to load support for non-us keyboards.
  

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