Welcome to the Slackware Documentation Project

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
slackware:beginners_guide [2012/09/26 01:59 (UTC)]
mfillpot [Post Installation Overview] updated internal link
slackware:beginners_guide [2017/10/15 10:08 (UTC)] (current)
alienbob How to update your packages using slackpkg
Line 24: Line 24:
 # useradd -m -g users -G wheel,​floppy,​audio,​video,​cdrom,​plugdev,​power,​netdev,​lp,​scanner -s /bin/bash slacker # useradd -m -g users -G wheel,​floppy,​audio,​video,​cdrom,​plugdev,​power,​netdev,​lp,​scanner -s /bin/bash slacker
 </​code>​ Once that’s done you can log in to your user account. \\ Log out of the root account (type ''​logout''​ at the root prompt) and then login using the new account you just created. Now come the really interesting adventures! </​code>​ Once that’s done you can log in to your user account. \\ Log out of the root account (type ''​logout''​ at the root prompt) and then login using the new account you just created. Now come the really interesting adventures!
 +
 +
 +===== Make Slackware Speak your Language =====
 +
 +Slackware'​s installer is English-only and it will also assume that English is the language in which you want to be addressed by the programs on your computer. If you are a non-English speaker and want your Slackware system to "​talk"​ to you in your own language, you should check out our instruction article "​[[slackware:​localization|Localization:​ Adapt Slackware to your own Language]]"​
  
  
Line 46: Line 51:
  
 You will need to update the ''​slackpkg''​ database from time to time, when you learn about the availability of new patches for your distribution. After updating the database you can let it download and install the updates. Again, see the [[slackware:​slackpkg|slackpkg]] page for guidelines about the use of this tool. You will need to update the ''​slackpkg''​ database from time to time, when you learn about the availability of new patches for your distribution. After updating the database you can let it download and install the updates. Again, see the [[slackware:​slackpkg|slackpkg]] page for guidelines about the use of this tool.
 +
 +==== Installing updates using slackpkg ====
 +
 +The ''​slackpkg update''​ command will connect to a Slackware mirror and update the local package information database on your computer. This command does not actually //install// any package!\\ The usual routine for upgrading your Slackware to the latest patches is as follows: <​code>​
 +# slackpkg update
 +# slackpkg install-new
 +# slackpkg upgrade-all
 +# slackpkg clean-system
 +</​code>​ The "​install-new",​ "​upgrade-all"​ and "​clean-system"​ commands will always show you a list of candidate packages to act on before excecuting anything. This allows you to review the suggested package alterations and select/​deselect anything you do not agree with.\\ The "​clean-system"​ is technically only needed after you upgrade from one Slackware release to the next (say, from  14.1 to 14.2) and it is meant to remove any Slackware package which is not (or no longer) part of the core distribution.
 +
 +<note important>​The ''​slackpkg clean-system''​ command regards any 3rd package as a candidate for removal! Therefore, be smart with your blacklist (''/​etc/​slackpkg/​blacklist''​)</​note>​
  
 ==== Watching for Updated Packages ==== ==== Watching for Updated Packages ====
Line 62: Line 78:
 [rsync_slackware_patches.sh:​] Please create it first, and then re-run this script. ​                           ​ [rsync_slackware_patches.sh:​] Please create it first, and then re-run this script. ​                           ​
 </​code>​ \\ You notice that you will have to edit the script and define a local directory (//and create that directory too!//) for the script to use. When that is done, you should run the script once - for a first-time download of patches. \\ Then you can use cron to run the script once a day. For instance, schedule the script to run at 05:33 every day, and let it check for updates to the 64-bit version of Slackware-13.37. Open the crontab editor by typing <​code>​crontab -e</​code>​ and then you add the following line to your cron table: <​code>​ </​code>​ \\ You notice that you will have to edit the script and define a local directory (//and create that directory too!//) for the script to use. When that is done, you should run the script once - for a first-time download of patches. \\ Then you can use cron to run the script once a day. For instance, schedule the script to run at 05:33 every day, and let it check for updates to the 64-bit version of Slackware-13.37. Open the crontab editor by typing <​code>​crontab -e</​code>​ and then you add the following line to your cron table: <​code>​
-33 5 * * *      /usr/local/sbin/​rsync_slackware_patches.sh -q -r 13.37 -a x86_64+33 5 * * *      /usr/local/bin/​rsync_slackware_patches.sh -q -r 13.37 -a x86_64
 </​code>​ This command will be executed silently (meaning you will not get emailed) if no new patches are found. However when the script finds updates it will download them and email you the script'​s output. You will get an email like this: <​code>​ </​code>​ This command will be executed silently (meaning you will not get emailed) if no new patches are found. However when the script finds updates it will download them and email you the script'​s output. You will get an email like this: <​code>​
 [rsync_slackware_patches.sh:​] New patches have arrived for Slackware 13.37 (x86_64)! [rsync_slackware_patches.sh:​] New patches have arrived for Slackware 13.37 (x86_64)!

In Other Languages
QR Code
QR Code slackware:beginners_guide (generated for current page)