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slackbook:install [2012/09/06 01:47 (UTC)]
mfillpot [Keymap] updated image alt text
slackbook:install [2012/09/12 20:43 (UTC)] (current)
sycamorex [Sources] Bullet Points
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-After pressing <​key>​ENTER</​key>​+After pressing <key>'ENTER'</​key>​
 you should see a lot of text go flying across your screen. Don't be you should see a lot of text go flying across your screen. Don't be
 alarmed, this is all perfectly normal. The text you see is generated by alarmed, this is all perfectly normal. The text you see is generated by
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-Entering <​key>​1</​key>​ and pressing <​key>​ENTER</​key>​ will+Entering <key>'1'</​key>​ and pressing <key>'ENTER'</​key>​ will
 give you a list of keyboard mappings. Simply select the mapping that give you a list of keyboard mappings. Simply select the mapping that
 matches your keyboard type and continue on. matches your keyboard type and continue on.
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-{{ :​slackbook:​setup-swap.png?​nolink&​550 |Help}}+{{ :​slackbook:​setup-swap.png?​nolink&​550 |Addswap}}
 ==== Target ==== ==== Target ====
  
-Our next step is selecting our root partition and any other partitions we'd like Slackware to utilize. You'll be given a choice of filesystems to use and whether or not to format the partition. If you're installing to a new partition you must format it. If you have a partition with data on it you'd like to save, don't. For example, many users have a seperate ''/​home''​ partition used for user data and elect not to format it on install. This lets them install newer versions of Slackware without having to backup and restore this data. +Our next step is selecting our root partition and any other 
 +partitions we'd like Slackware to utilize. You'll be given a choice ​ 
 +of filesystems to use and whether or not to format the partition. If 
 +you're installing to a new partition you must format it. If you have 
 +a partition with data on it you'd like to save, don't. For example, 
 +many users have a seperate ''/​home''​ partition used 
 +for user data and elect not to format it on install. This lets them 
 +install newer versions of Slackware without having to backup and 
 +restore this data.
  
-{{ :​slackware:​setup_target_cl.png?​nolink |}} 
  
 +{{ :​slackbook:​setup-target.png?​nolink&​550 |Target}}
 ==== Source ==== ==== Source ====
  
-Here you'll tell the installer where to find the Slackware packages. The most common method is to use the Slackware install DVD or CDs, but there are various other options are available. If you have your packages installed to a partition that you setup in the previous step, you can install from that partition or a pre-mounted directory. (You may need to mount that partition with ''​mount(8)'' ​first. See chapter 11 for more details.) Additionally,​ Slackware offers a variety of networked options such as NFS shares, FTP, HTTP, and Samba. If you select a network installation,​ Slackware will prompt you for TCP/IP information first. We're only going to discuss installation from the DVD, but other methods are similar and straightforward. +Here you'll tell the installer where to find the Slackware packages. 
- +The most common method is to use the Slackware install DVD or CDs,  
-{{ :​slackware:​setup_source_cl.png?​nolink |}}+but various other options are available. If you have your 
 +packages installed to a partition that you setup in the previous 
 +step, you can install from that partition or a pre-mounted directory. 
 +(You may need to mount that partition with 
 +**//mount//**(8) first. See chapter 11 for more 
 +details.) Additionally,​ Slackware offers a variety of networked 
 +options such as NFS shares, FTP, HTTP, and Samba. If you select a 
 +network installation,​ Slackware will prompt you for TCP/IP 
 +information first. We're only going to discuss installation from the 
 +DVD, but other methods are similar and straightforward.
  
 +{{ :​slackbook:​setup-source.png?​nolink&​550 |Source}}
 ==== Select ==== ==== Select ====
  
-One unique feature of Slackware is its manner of dividing packages into disksets. At the beginning of time, network access to FTP servers was available only through incredibly slow 300 baud modems, so Slackware was split into disk sets that would fit onto floppy disks so users could download and install only those packages they were interested in. Today that practice continues and the installer allows you to chose which sets to install. This allows you to easily skip packages you may not want, such as X and [[slackware:​kde|KDE]] on headless servers or Emacs on everything. Please note that the "​A"​ series is always required. ​+One unique feature of Slackware is its manner of dividing packages 
 +into disksets. At the beginning of time, network access to FTP  
 +servers was available only through incredibly slow 300 baud modems, 
 +so Slackware was split into disk sets that would fit onto floppy 
 +disks so users could download and install only those packages they 
 +were interested in. Today that practice continues and the installer 
 +allows you to chose which sets to install. This allows you to 
 +easily skip packages you may not want, such as X and KDE on headless 
 +servers or Emacs on everything. Please note that the //"​A"​// series is 
 +always required.
  
-{{ :​slackware:​setup_select_cl.png?​nolink |}} 
  
 +{{ :​slackbook:​setup-select.png?​nolink&​550 |Select}}
 ==== Install ==== ==== Install ====
  
-Finally we get to the meat of the installer. At this stage, Slackware will ask you what method to use to choose ​packages. If this is your first time installing Slackware, the "​full"​ method is highly recommended. Even if this isn't your first time, you'll probably want to use it anyway.+Finally we get to the meat of the installer. At this stage, Slackware 
 +will ask you what method to use to chose packages. If this is your 
 +first time installing Slackware, the //"​full"​// method is highly 
 +recommended. Even if this isn't your first time, you'll probably want 
 +to use it anyway. ​
  
-The "​menu"​ and "​expert"​ options allow you to choose individual packages to install and are of use to skilled users familiar with the OS. These methods allow such users to quickly prune packages from the installer to build a very minimal system. If you don't know what you're doing (sometimes even if you do) you're likely to leave out crucial pieces of software and end up with a broken system. 
  
-The "newbie" ​method can be very helpful ​to a new user, but takes a very long time to install. This method will install all the required packages, then prompt you individually for every other package. The big advantage here is that is pauses ​and gives you a brief overview ​of the package contentsFor new user, this introduction into what is included ​with Slackware can be informative. For most other users it is long and tedious process.+The //"menu"// and //"​expert"//​ options allow you to choose 
 +individual packages ​to install and are of use to skilled users 
 +familiar with the OSThese methods allow such users to quickly prune 
 +packages from the installer to build very minimal system. If you 
 +don't know what you're doing (sometimes even if you do) you're likely 
 +to leave out crucial pieces of software and end up with a broken 
 +system.
  
-The "​custom"​ and "​tagpath"​ options should only be used by people with the greatest skill and expertise with Slackware. These methods allow the user to install packages from custom tagfiles. Tagfiles are only rarely used. We won't discuss them in this book.  
  
-{{ :​slackware:​setup_install_cl.png?nolink |}}+The //"​newbie"//​ method can be very helpful to a new user, but 
 +takes a very long time to install. This method will install all the 
 +required packages, then prompt you individually for every other 
 +package. The big advantage here is that is pauses and gives you a  
 +brief overview of the package contents. For a new user, this 
 +introduction into what is included with Slackware can be informative. 
 +For most other users it is a long and tedious process.
  
 +
 +The //"​custom"//​ and //"​tagpath"//​ options should only be used by people with
 +the greatest skill and expertise with Slackware. These methods allow
 +the user to install packages from custom tagfiles. Tagfiles are
 +only rarely used. We won't discuss them in this book.
 +
 +
 +{{ :​slackbook:​setup-install.png?​nolink&​550 |Install}}
 ==== Configure ==== ==== Configure ====
  
-Once all the packages are installed you're nearly finished. At this stage, Slackware will prompt you with a variety of configuration tasks for your new operating system. Many of these are optional, but most users will need to set something up here. Depending on the packages you've installed, you may be offered different configuration options than the ones shown here, but we've included all the really important ones.+Once all the packages are installed you're nearly finished. At this 
 +stage, Slackware will prompt you with a variety of configuration 
 +tasks for your new operating system. Many of these are optional, but 
 +most users will need to set something up here. Depending on the  
 +packages you've installed, you may be offered different configuration 
 +options than the ones shown here, but we've included all the really 
 +important ones. 
 + 
 + 
 +The first thing you'll likely be prompted to do is setup a boot disk. 
 +In the past this was typically a 1.44MB floppy disk, but today'​s 
 +Linux kernel is far too large to fit on a single floppy, so 
 +Slackware offers to create a bootable USB flash memory stick. Of 
 +course, your computer must support booting from USB in order to use 
 +a USB boot stick (most modern computers do). If you do not intend to 
 +use LILO or another traditional boot loader, you should consider 
 +making a USB boot stick. Please note that doing so will erase the  
 +contents of whatever memory stick you're using, so be careful. 
 + 
 + 
 +{{ :​slackbook:​usb-boot-stick.png?​nolink&​550 |Configure}}
  
-The first thing you'll likely be prompted ​to do is setup a boot disk. In the past this was typically a 1.44MB floppy diskbut today'​s ​Linux kernel ​is far too larger ​to fit on a single floppyso Slackware offers ​to create ​bootable USB flash memory stickOf course, your computer ​must support booting from USB in order to use a USB boot stick (most modern computers do). If you do not intend ​to use LILO or another traditional boot loader, you should consider making a USB boot stickPlease note that doing so will erase the contents of whatever memory stick you're using, so be careful+Nearly everyone will need to setup the LInux LOaderLILO. LILO is 
 +in charge of booting the Linux kernel ​and connecting ​to an initrd or 
 +the root filesystem. Without it (or some other boot loader)your new 
 +Slackware operating system will not boot. Slackware offers a few 
 +options hereThe //"​simple"//​ method attempts to automatically configure 
 +LILO for your computerand works well with very simple systems. If  
 +Slackware is the only operating system on your computer, it should 
 +configure and install LILO for you without any hassels. If you don'​t 
 +trust the simpler method ​to work, or if you want to take an in-depth 
 +look at how to configure LILOthe //"​expert"//​ method is really not all 
 +that complicated. This method will take you through each step and 
 +offer to setup dual-boot for Windows and other Linux operating 
 +systemsIt also allows ​you to append kernel command parameters (most 
 +users will not need to specify any though).
  
-{{ :​slackware:​usb_boot_stick_cl.png?​nolink |}} 
  
-Nearly everyone will need to setup the LInux LOader, LILO. LILO is in charge ​of booting the Linux kernel and connecting to an initrd or the root filesystem. Without it (or some other boot loader), ​your new Slackware ​operating ​system ​will not boot. Slackware offers a few options here. The "​simple"​ method attempts to automatically configure LILO for your computerand works well with very simple systems. If Slackware ​is the only operating system on your computer, ​it should configure and install LILO for you without any hassle. If you don't trust the simpler method to workor if you want to take an in-depth look at how to configure LILOthe "​expert"​ method is really not all that complicated. This method will take you through each step and offer to setup dual-boot for Windows and other Linux operating systems. It also allows you to append kernel command parameters (most users will not need to specify any though).+LILO is a very important part of your Slackware system, ​so an entire 
 +section of the next chapter ​is devoted to it. If you're having 
 +difficulty configuring LILO at this stage, you may want to skip ahead 
 +and read Chapter 3 firstthen return here.
  
-LILO is a very important part of your Slackware system, so an entire section of the next chapter is devoted to it. If you're having difficulty configuring LILO at this stage, you may want to skip ahead and read Chapter 3 first, then return here.  
  
-{{ :slackware:setup_lilo_cl.png?nolink |}}+{{ :slackbook:setup-lilo.png?nolink&​550 ​|lilo}}
  
-This simple step allows you to configure and activate a console mouse for use outside of the graphical desktops. By activating a console mouse, you'll be able to easily copy and paste from within the Slackware terminal. Most users will need to choose one of the first three options, but many are offered, and yes those ancient two-button serial mice do work. +This simple step allows you to configure and activate a console mouse 
 +for use outside of the graphical desktops. By activating a console 
 +mouse, you'll be able to easily copy and paste from within the 
 +Slackware terminal. Most users will need to choose one of the first 
 +three options, but many are offered, and yes those ancient two-button 
 +serial mice do work.
  
-The next stage in configuring your install is the network configuration. If you don't wish to configure your network at this stage, you may decline, but otherwise you'll be prompted to provide a hostname for your computer. Do not enter a domain name, only the hostname. 
  
-The following screen will prompt you for a domainname, such as example.org. The combination of the hostname and the domainname can be used to navigate between computers in your network if you use an internal DNS service or maintain your /etc/hosts file.+{{ :​slackbook:​setup-mouse.png?​nolink&​550 |mouse}}
  
-You have three options when setting ​your IP address; ​you may assign it a static IPor you may use DHCPor you may configure ​loopback connectionThe simplest optionand probably the most common for laptops or computers on a basic network, ​is to let a DHCP server assign IP addresses dynamically. In practice, this often results in a consistent address since both dhcpcd and dhclient initially request the same address previously assigned. If the address is unavailable then the machine gets a new one, but on small networks this may never happen.+The next stage in configuring ​your install is the network 
 +configuration. If you don't wish to configure your network at this 
 +stage, you may declinebut otherwise ​you'll be prompted to 
 +provide ​hostname for your computerIf you're unsure what to do 
 +hereyou might want to read through [[slackbook:​network|Networking|Chapter 14Networking]] 
 +first.
  
-If the DHCP server on your network requires a specific DHCP hostname before you're permitted to connect. You can enter this on the Set DHCP Hostname screen. 
  
-To use static IP address, you must provide: ​+The following screens will prompt you first for hostnamethen 
 +for a domainname, such as 
 +example.org. The combination of the hostname and the domainname 
 +can be used to navigate between computers in your network if you 
 +use an internal DNS service or maintain your 
 +''/​etc/​hosts''​ file. If you skip setting 
 +up your network, Slackware will name your computer //"​darkstar"//​ after 
 +a song by the Grateful Dead.
  
-**Static IP Address** 
  
-  * IP Address: the address ​of your computer, such as ''​192.168.1.1''​ (for IPv4). Also, you should verify that no DHCP server on your network is set to assign ​that same address out as part of its DHCP pool, or you may encounter address conflicts.  +You have three options when setting your IP addressyou may 
-  * Netmask: the subnet mask for your network; often ''​255.255.255.0''​ for small networks. ​ +assign ​it static IP, use DHCP, or configure a 
-  * Gateway Address: the address of the gateway ​server ​providing internet access to your networkOn small networks, this will probably be provided by your ISP while on larger networks ​you may use an internal ​server ​which handles the traffic. In other wordsthis may be an internal ​address ​like ''​192.168.1.1''​ or it might be an address provided by your ISP, such as ''​75.146.49.79'​'  +loopback connectionThe simplest option, and probably the most 
-  * Nameserver: most likely, you'll want to utilize DNS; in this initial setupprovide your primary domain name server. Edit /​etc/​resolv.conf to add secondary and tertiary servers later+common ​for laptops or computers on a basic network, is to let a 
 +DHCP server ​assign IP addresses dynamicallyUnless ​you are 
 +installing Slackware for use as a network ​server, ​you probably 
 +do not need to setup a static IP address. ​If you're not sure which 
 +of these options ​to choosepick DHCP.
  
-The final screen during static IP address configuration is a confirmation screen, where you're permitted to accept your choices, edit them, or even restart the IP address configuration in case you decide to use DHCP instead. 
  
-Your network configuration is now complete. The next screen prompts ​you to configure the startup services that you wish to run automatically upon bootRead the descriptions that appear both to the right of the service name as well as at the bottom of the screen ​in order to decide whether that service should be turned on by defaultThese can always be modified later with pkgtool > Setup > Services.+Rarely DHCP servers requires ​you specify a DHCP 
 +hostname before ​you're permitted ​to connectYou can enter this on 
 +the Set DHCP Hostname ​screen. ​This is almost ​always be the same 
 +hostname you entered earlier.
  
-As the startup services window warns, you should only turn on the startup services that you actually intend to use. This not only decreases boot time but makes for a more secure system. 
  
-Every computer needs to keep track of the current timeand with so many timezones how does Slackware ​know which one to use? Well, you have to tell it which one to use, and that's why this step is here. If your computer'​s hardware clock is set to UTC (Coordinated Universal Time), you'll need to select that; most hardware clocks are not set to UTC from the factory (though you could set it that way on your own; Slackware doesn'​t care). Then simply select your timezone from the list provided and off you go+If you choose ​to set a static IP address, Slackware ​will ask you to 
 +enter it along with the netmask, gateway IP address, and what 
 +nameserver ​to use.
  
-If you installed the X disk set, you'll be prompted to select a default window manager or desktop environment. What you select here will apply to every user on your computer, unless that user decides to run ''​xwmconfig(1)''​ and choose a different one. Don't be alarmed if the options you see below do not match the ones Slackware offers you. xwmconfig only offers choices that you installed. So for example, if you elected to skip the "​KDE"​ disk set, KDE will not be offered. ​ 
  
-{{ :​slackware:​setup_xwmconfig_cl.png?nolink |}}+The final screen during static IP address configuration is a 
 +confirmation screen, where you're permitted to accept your 
 +choices, edit them, or even restart the IP address configuration 
 +in case you decide to use DHCP instead.
  
- The last configuration step is setting a root password. The root user is the "super user" on Slackware and all other UNIX-like operating systems. Think of root as the Administrator user. root knows all, sees all, and can do all, so setting a strong root password is just common sense. 
  
-With this last step complete, ​you can now exit the Slackware installer and reboot with a good old **CTRL + ALT + DELETE**Remove ​the Slackware installation disk, and if you performed all the steps correctly, your computer will boot into your new Slackware linux system. If something went wrong, you probably skipped ​the LILO configuration step or made an error there somehow. Thankfully, the next chapter should help you sort that out+Once your network configuration is completed Slackware will 
-===== Post Installation =====+prompt ​you to configure ​the startup services that you wish to run 
 +automatically upon bootHelpful descriptions of each service appear 
 +both to the right of the service name as well as at the bottom of the 
 +screen. If you're not sure what to turn on, you can safely leave the 
 +defaults in placeWhat services are started at boot time can be 
 +easily modified later with **//​pkgtool//​**.
  
-When you have rebooted into your new Slackware installation,​ the very first step you should take is to create a user. By default, the only user that exists after the install is the root user, and it's dangerous to use your computer as root, given that there are no restrictions as to what that user can do. 
  
-The quickest and easiest way to create a normal user for yourself is to log in as root with the root password that you created at the end of the intallation process, and then issue the `adduser` commandThis will interactively assist ​you in creating a usersee the section called [[slackbook:​users|Managing Users and Groups]] for more information.+Every computer needs to keep track of the current time, and with so 
 +many timezones around ​the world you 
 +have to tell Slackware which one to use. 
 +If your computer'​s hardware clock is set to UTC (Coordinated 
 +Universal Time), ​you'll need to select thatmost hardware clocks are 
 +not set to UTC from the factory (though you could set it that way on 
 +your own; Slackware doesn'​t care). Then simply select your timezone 
 +from the list provided ​and off you go.
  
-Another important step is to make sure that your installation is up-to-date as new updates are being released that can include security fixes. To do that we can use the [[slackware:​slackpkg|slackpkg]] tool to update the list of packages and install new updates with it. 
  
-One last thing there will be mail in the root user's mailbox filled with useful information about package management, as well as system configuration and maintenance. You should check it with your favorite mail client. If you have not used any of the included mail clients, alpine is a good suggestion to get started quickly and easily.+{{ :​slackbook:​setup-timezone.png?​nolink&​550 |timezone}}
  
-=== Configuring Graphical Logins === +If you installed the X disk set, you'll be prompted ​to select a 
-Once your system is up to date and you have created your first user, you may want to configure your system to boot into X by default, ​with graphical login instead of a console login You can first test that X auto-detects your video correctly by issuing ​the `startx` command If X11 starts and you end up at a desktop, you're probably good to go.  Open the /etc/inittab fileas root, in your editor of choice ​Change the following line:+default ​window manager or desktop environment. What you select 
 +here will apply to every user on your computerunless that user 
 +decides to run **//​xwmconfig//​**(1) and choose 
 +different oneDon't be alarmed if the options you see below do 
 +not match the ones Slackware offers you 
 +**//​xwmconfig//​** only offers choices that you 
 +installed. So for exampleif you elected ​to skip the //"​KDE"//​ disk set, 
 +KDE will not be offered.
  
-  # Default runlevel. (Do not set to 0 or 6) 
-  id:​3:​initdefault:​ 
-  ​ 
-To be this: 
  
-  # Default runlevel. (Do not set to 0 or 6) +{{ :slackbook:setup-xwmconfig.png?​nolink&​550 |xwmconfig}}
-  id:4:​initdefault:+
  
-This sets your default run-level to 4, which is Slackware'​s ​"graphics-only" ​mode (with one extra tty open just in case, on vty 6) Save, and on your next reboot the system will boot into nice graphical login.+The last configuration step is setting a root password. The root 
 +user is the //"super user"// on Slackware and all other UNIX-like 
 +operating systems. Think of root as the Administrator userroot 
 +knows all, sees all, and can do all, so setting ​strong root 
 +password is just common sense.
  
-You can manually enter run-level 4 by entering, as root, `init 4`. 
  
-To select or switch between available [[slackware:​desktop_environment|desktop environments]] run ''​xwmconfig'' ​as root+With this last step complete, you can now exit the Slackware 
-===== References =====+installer and reboot with a good old <key>'CTRL'</​key>​ + 
 +<key>'ALT'</​key>​ + <​key>'​DELETE'</​key>​Remove the  
 +Slackware installation disk, and if you performed all the steps 
 +correctly, your computer will boot into your new Slackware 
 +linux system. If something went wrong, you probably skipped the 
 +LILO configuration step or made an error there somehow. Thankfully,​ 
 +the next chapter should help you sort that out.
  
-  * Original source: http://​slackbook.org/​beta/#​ch_install (authors: Alan Hicks, Chris Lumens, David Cantrell, Logan Johnson) 
  
-===== External links =====+When you have rebooted into your new Slackware installation,​ the 
 +very first step you should take is to create a user. By 
 +default, the only user that exists after the install is the root 
 +user, and it's dangerous to use your computer as root, given that 
 +there are no restrictions as to what that user can do.
  
-  * [[ftp://​ftp.slackware.com/​pub/​slackware-iso/​ | Slackware ISO files]] 
-  * [[http://​slackware.com/​getslack/​torrents.php | Slackware TORRENT files]] 
  
-==== Slackware 13.37: ​distribution ​to (re)discover (in French) ====+The quickest and easiest way to create ​normal user for yourself 
 +is to log in as root with the root password that you created at 
 +the end of the intallation process, and then issue the 
 +**//​adduser//​** command. This will interactively assist 
 +you in creating a user; see [[slackbook:​users|User and Group Management|the section called “Managing Users and Groups"​]] for more 
 +information.
  
-This is a series of four detailed articles about Slackware, written by Kiki Novak for the french magazine //Planète Linux// (issues 67, 68, 69 and 70, November 2011 - May 2012). ​ 
  
-**Author'​s note**: I do own the rights for these articles, so I've decided to link to them here. Feel free to cannibalize them as you wish, e. g. include parts of them - or the articles as a whole - in this wiki, change them as you feel inclined, quote them extensively,​ and translate bits of them or the whole series. To help you do this, I've included all the original files that were used in the making of these articles: original text in ODT format as well as all the screenshots in PNG format. Check out the links below the list.+====== Chapter Navigation ======
  
-  ​[[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware1.pdf | Slackware 13.37: a distribution to (re)discover (Part 1, PDF 2.5 MB, in French)]]  +**Previous Chapter: [[slackbook:intro_to_slackware|Introduction]]**
-    ​History of Slackware +
-    * A few good reasons to choose Slackware +
-    * A few good reasons not to choose Slackware +
-    * It's not a bug, it's a feature! +
-    * How to get Slackware +
-    * Slackware-specific documentation +
-  * [[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware2.pdf | Slackware 13.37: a distribution to (re)discover (Part 2, PDF 3.1 MB, in French)]]  +
-    * Choose your boot parameters +
-    * Select your keyboard layout +
-    * Partition your hard disk +
-    * Format your partitions +
-    * Decide what you want to install +
-    * Configure and install the bootloader +
-    * Your mouse in console mode +
-    * Networking and services +
-    * Which font for the console? +
-    * System clock and timezone +
-    * Which graphical environment?​ +
-    * A password for root +
-    * Finish the installation and reboot +
-    * What now? +
-  * [[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware3.pdf ​Slackware 13.37: a distribution to (re)discover (Part 3, PDF 2.5 MB, in French)]]  +
-    * Create an initrd and use the generic kernel +
-    * Fine-tune the LILO bootloader +
-    * Configure the network +
-    * Add one or more users +
-    * Configure the sound +
-  * [[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware4.pdf | Slackware 13.37: a distribution to (re)discover (Part 4, PDF 3.4 MB, in French)]]  +
-    * Traditional Slackware package management +
-    * Manage official Slackware packages using slackpkg +
-    * Help! I can't find a package I need! +
-    * Building a package using a SlackBuild script from SlackBuilds.org +
-    * Manage SlackBuilds comfortably using sbopkg +
-    * Configure the graphical server X.org +
-    ​Select your graphical environment +
-    ​Slackware in French ​+
  
-Original ​files (ODT manuscriptscreenshotsetc.):+**Next Chapter: [[slackbook:​booting|Booting]]** 
 +====== Sources ====== 
 +<!-- If you copy information from another source, then specify that source --> 
 +  * Original ​source: [[http://​www.slackbook.org/​beta]] \\ 
 +<!-- Authors are allowed to give credit to themselves! --> 
 +  * Originally written by Alan HicksChris LumensDavid Cantrell, Logan Johnson 
 +<!-- * Contrbutions by [[wiki:user:yyy | User Y]] -->
  
-  * [[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware1.zip | Part 1ZIP archive 3.3 MB]] +<!-- Please do not modify anything belowexcept adding new tags.--> 
-  * [[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware2.zip | Part 2, ZIP archive 0.5 MB]] +<!-- You must also remove the tag-word "​template"​ belowOtherwise your page will not show up in the Table of Contents --> 
-  * [[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware3.zip | Part 3, ZIP archive 0.6 MB]] +{{tag>​slackbook install setup partitioning}}
-  * [[http://​microlinux.fr/​articles/​slackware4.zip | Part 4, ZIP archive 1.5 MB]]+

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