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slackbook:bash [2012/09/08 18:04 (UTC)]
mfillpot [Task Management] updated section to match original with formatting
slackbook:bash [2012/10/14 15:52 (UTC)] (current)
mfillpot removed all bash flags
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 dealing with long filenames: tab completion. ​ Tab completion enables dealing with long filenames: tab completion. ​ Tab completion enables
 you to type just enough of the filename to uniquely identify it, then you to type just enough of the filename to uniquely identify it, then
-by hitting the <​key>​TAB</​key>​ key, **//​bash//​** will fill in+by hitting the <key>'TAB'</​key>​ key, **//​bash//​** will fill in
 the rest for you.  Even if you haven'​t typed in enough text to uniquely the rest for you.  Even if you haven'​t typed in enough text to uniquely
 identify a filename, the shell will fill in as much as it can for you. identify a filename, the shell will fill in as much as it can for you.
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 temporarily halt a running process, perform some other task, then temporarily halt a running process, perform some other task, then
 resume it or optionally make it run in the background. Upon pressing resume it or optionally make it run in the background. Upon pressing
-<​key>​CTRL-Z</​key>,​ **//​bash//​** will suspend+<key>'CTRL'</​key>​+<​key>'​z'​</​key>,​ **//​bash//​** will suspend
 the running process and return you to a prompt. You can return to that the running process and return you to a prompt. You can return to that
 process later. ​ Additionally,​ you can suspend multiple processes in process later. ​ Additionally,​ you can suspend multiple processes in
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 ===== Terminals ===== ===== Terminals =====
  
-Slackware Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems allow users to interact with them in many ways, but the most common, and arguably the most useful, is the terminal. In the old days, terminals were keyboards and monitors (sometimes even mice) wired into a mainframe or server via serial connections. Today however, most terminals are virtual; that is, they exist only in software. Virtual terminals allow users to connect to the computer without requiring expensive and often incompatible hardware. Rather, a user needs only to run the software and they are presented with a (usually) highly customizable virtual terminal.+Slackware Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems allow users to 
 +interact with them in many ways, but the most common, and arguably the 
 +most useful, is the terminal. In the old days, terminals were keyboards 
 +and monitors (sometimes even mice) wired into a mainframe or server via 
 +serial connections. Today however, most terminals are virtual; that is, 
 +they exist only in software. ​ Virtual terminals allow users to connect 
 +to the computer without requiring expensive and often incompatible 
 +hardware. Rather, a user needs only to run the software and they are 
 +presented with a (usually) highly customizable virtual terminal.
  
-The most common virtual terminals (in that every Slackware Linux machine is going to have at least one) are the gettys. agetty(8) runs six instances by default on Slackware, and allows local users (those who can physically sit down in front of the computer and type at the keyboard) to login and run applications. Each of these gettys is available on different tty devices that are accessible seperately by pressing the **ALT** key and one of the function keys from **F1** through **F6**. Using these gettys allows you to login multiple times, perhaps as different users, and run applications in those users' shells silmutaneously. This is most commonly done with servers which do not have X installed, but can be done on any machine. 
  
-On desktops, laptops, and other workstations where the user prefers a graphical interface provided by X, most terminals are graphical. Slackware ​includes many different graphical terminalsbut the most commonly used are KDE's konsole ​and XFCE's Terminal(1) as well as the old standby, xterm(1)If you are using a graphical interfacecheck your tool bars or menus. Each desktop environment or window manager has a virtual terminal (often called a terminal emulater), and they are all labelled differently. Typically though, you will find them under a "​System"​ sub-menu ​in desktop environmentsExecuting ​any of these will give you a graphical terminal and automatically run your default shell.+The most common virtual ​terminals ​(in that every Slackware Linux machine 
 +is going to have at least one) are the gettys. 
 +**//​agetty//​**(8) runs six instances by default on 
 +Slackware, ​and allows local users (those who can physically sit down in 
 +front of the computer and type at the keyboard) to login and run 
 +applications. Each of these gettys is available on different tty 
 +devices that are accessible seperately by pressing the 
 +<key>'ALT'</​key>​ key and one of the function keys from 
 +<​key>'​F1'</​key>​ through <​key>'​F6'</​key>​Using these gettys 
 +allows ​you to login multiple timesperhaps as different users, and run 
 +applications ​in those users' shells silmutaneouslyThis is most 
 +commonly done with servers which do not have 
 +**//X//** installed, but can be done on any machine.
  
 +
 +On desktops, laptops, and other workstations where the user prefers a
 +graphical interface provided by **//X//**, most
 +terminals are graphical. ​ Slackware includes many different graphical
 +terminals, but the most commonly used are KDE's
 +**//​konsole//​** and XFCE's
 +**//​Terminal//​**(1) as well as the old standby,
 +xterm(1). If you are using a graphical interface, check your tool bars
 +or menus. Each desktop environment or window manager has a virtual
 +terminal (often called a terminal emulater), and they are all labelled
 +differently. Typically though, you will find them under a //"​System"//​
 +sub-menu in desktop environments. Executing any of these will give you
 +a graphical terminal and automatically run your default shell.
 ===== Customization ===== ===== Customization =====
  
-By now you should be pretty familiar with bash and you may have even noticed some odd behavior. For example, when you login at the console, you're presented with a prompt that looks a bit like this.+By now you should be pretty familiar with 
 +**//bash//** and you may have even noticed some odd 
 +behavior. For example, when you login at the console, you're presented 
 +with a prompt that looks a bit like this. 
  
 <​code>​ <​code>​
-alan@darkstar:​~$ ​ +alan@darkstar:​~$ </​code>​ 
-</​code>​+ 
 However, sometimes you'll see a much less helpful prompt like this one. However, sometimes you'll see a much less helpful prompt like this one.
 +
  
 <​code>​ <​code>​
-bash-3.1$ ​ +bash-3.1$ </​code>​ 
-</​code>​+ 
 + 
 +The cause here is a special environment variable that controls the 
 +**//​bash//​** prompt. Some shells are considered 
 +//"​login"//​ shells and others are //"​interactive"//​ shells, and both types read 
 +different configuration files when started. Login shells read 
 +''/​etc/​profile''​ and 
 +''​~/​.bash_profile''​ when executed. Interactive shells 
 +read ''​~/​.bashrc''​ instead. This has some advantages 
 +for power users, but is a common annoyance for many new users who want 
 +the same environment anytime they execute 
 +**//​bash//​** and don't care about the difference 
 +between login and interactive shells. If this applies to you, simply 
 +edit your own ~/.bashrc file and include the following lines. 
 +(For more information on 
 +the different configuration files used, read the INVOCATION section of 
 +the **//​bash//​** man page.)
  
-The cause here is a special environment variable that controls the bash prompt. Some shells are considered "​login"​ shells and others are "​interactive"​ shells, and both types read different configuration files when started. Login shells read /​etc/​profile and ~/​.bash_profile when executed. Interactive shells read ~/.bashrc instead. This has some advantages for power users, but is a common annoyance for many new users who want the same environment anytime they execute bash and don't care about the difference between login and interactive shells. If this applies to you, simply edit your own ~/.bashrc file and include the following lines. (For more information on the different configuration files used, read the INVOCATION section of the bash man page.) 
  
 <​code>​ <​code>​
 +
 # ~/.bashrc # ~/.bashrc
 . /​etc/​profile . /​etc/​profile
Line 329: Line 383:
 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-When using the above, all your login and interactive shells will have the same environment settings and behave identically. Now, anytime we wish to customize a shell setting, we only have to edit ~/​.bash_profile for user-specific changes and /​etc/​profile for global settings. Let's start by configuring the prompt. 
  
-bash prompts come in all shapes, colors, and sizes, and every user has their own preferances. Personally, I prefer short and simple prompts that take up a minimum of space, but I've seen and used mutli-line prompts many times. One personal friend of mine even included ASCII-art in his bash prompt. To change your prompt you need only to change your PS1 variable. By default, Slackware attempts to configure your PS1 variable thusly:+When using the above, all your login and interactive shells will have 
 +the same environment settings and behave identically. Now, anytime we 
 +wish to customize a shell setting, we only have to edit 
 +''​~/​.bash_profile''​ for user-specific changes and 
 +''/​etc/​profile''​ for global settings. Let's start by 
 +configuring the prompt. 
 + 
 + 
 +**//bash//** prompts come in all shapes, colors, and 
 +sizes, and every user has their own preferances. Personally, I prefer 
 +short and simple prompts that take up a minimum of space, but I've seen 
 +and used mutli-line prompts many times. One personal friend of mine 
 +even included ASCII-art in his bash prompt. To change your prompt you 
 +need only to change your PS1 variable. By default, Slackware attempts 
 +to configure your PS1 variable thusly: 
  
 <​code>​ <​code>​
 darkstar:~$ echo $PS1 darkstar:~$ echo $PS1
-\u@\h:​\w\$ ​ +\u@\h:\w\$ </​code>​
-</​code>​+
  
-Yes, this tiny piece of funny-looking figures controls your bash prompt. Basicaly, every character in the PS1 variable is included in the prompt, unless it is a escaped by a \, which tells bash to interpret it. There are many different escape sequences and we can't discuss them all, but I'll explain these. The first "​\u"​ translates to the username of the current user. "​\h"​ is the hostname of the machine the terminal is attached to. "​\w"​ is the current working directory, and "​\$"​ displays either a # or a $ sign, depending on whether or not the current user is root. A complete listing of all prompt escape sequences is listed in the bash man page under the PROMPTING section. 
  
-Since we've gone through all this trouble to discuss the default prompt, I thought I'd take some time to show you a couple example prompts and the PS1 variable values needed to use them.+Yes, this tiny piece of funny-looking figures controls your 
 +**//​bash//​** prompt. Basicaly, every character in 
 +the PS1 variable is included in the prompt, unless it is a escaped by a 
 +<​key>'​\'</​key>,​ which tells **//​bash//​** to 
 +interpret it. There are many different escape sequences and we can'​t 
 +discuss them all, but I'll explain these. ​ The first //"​\u"//​ translates to 
 +the username of the current user.  //"​\h"//​ is the hostname of the machine 
 +the terminal is attached to. //"​\w"//​ is the current working directory, and 
 +//"​\$"//​ displays either a <​key>'#'</​key>​ or a <​key>'​$'</​key>​ sign, 
 +depending on whether or not the current user is root.  A complete 
 +listing of all prompt escape sequences is listed in the 
 +**//​bash//​** man page under the PROMPTING section. 
 + 
 + 
 +Since we've gone through all this trouble to discuss the default 
 +prompt, I thought I'd take some time to show you a couple example 
 +prompts and the PS1 variable values needed to use them. 
  
 <​code>​ <​code>​
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-For even more information on configuring your bash prompt, including information on setting up colored prompts, refer to /​usr/​doc/​Linux-HOWTOs/​Bash-Prompt-HOWTO. After reading that for a short while, you'll get an idea of just how powerful your bash prompts can be. I once even had a prompt that gave me up to date weather information such as temperature and barometric pressure! 
  
 +For even more information on configuring your bash prompt, including
 +information on setting up colored prompts, refer to
 +''/​usr/​doc/​Linux-HOWTOs/​Bash-Prompt-HOWTO''​. After
 +reading that for a short while, you'll get an idea of just how powerful
 +your **//​bash//​** prompts can be. I once even had a
 +prompt that gave me up to date weather information such as temperature
 +and barometric pressure!
 +
 +====== Chapter Navigation ======
 +
 +**Previous Chapter: [[slackbook:​shell|Basic Shell Commands]]**
 +
 +**Next Chapter: [[slackbook:​process_control|Process Control]]**
 ====== Sources ====== ====== Sources ======
 <!-- If you copy information from another source, then specify that source --> <!-- If you copy information from another source, then specify that source -->
- * Original source: [[http://​www.slackbook.org/​beta/#ch_bash]] +  ​* Original source: [[http://​www.slackbook.org/​beta]] ​\\
 <!-- Authors are allowed to give credit to themselves! --> <!-- Authors are allowed to give credit to themselves! -->
-<​!-- ​* Originally written by [[wiki:​user:​xxx | User X]] -->+  ​* Originally written by Alan Hicks, Chris Lumens, David Cantrell, Logan Johnson
 <!-- * Contrbutions by [[wiki:​user:​yyy | User Y]] --> <!-- * Contrbutions by [[wiki:​user:​yyy | User Y]] -->
  

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